Want to learn more about the Chamber’s legislative priorities for 2014?

On Thursday, Chamber CEO Paul Guzzi went On the Record with NECN’s Latoyia Edwards to discuss the Chamber’s 2014 Advocacy Agenda, the latest on the Chamber/Federal Reserve Bank of Boston partnership on internships and talent retention, and the first meeting of the BRA under new Mayor Marty Walsh. Watch the interview here.

Guzzi also spoke with WBZ NewsRadio’s Joe Mathieu on Thursday to discuss the latest findings in the Federal Reserve Beige Book, and the Boston Fed’s grant program that is giving $1.8 million to 6 towns in Massachusetts to spur economic growth. Listen to this interview here.

Chamber working with new Mayor Walsh to achieve economic growth

As the new Mayor of Boston, Martin J. Walsh, along with city administrators, has a unique opportunity to develop and execute a plan that will solidify Boston’s standing as a major hub of economic development and a great place to live and work for years to come.

Last month, the Chamber released a new report, “A Growth Agenda for Boston,” that recommends four initiatives for Mayor Walsh and his administration on how to sustain and build on the city’s strong economic growth:

  • Regional Infrastructure: A cooperative effort by business and local government leaders throughout Greater Boston to advance three critical initiatives: the expansion of South Station, new international connections at Logan Airport, and improvements to the Port of Boston.
  • Charter School Floating Cap: A “floating cap” to expand the supply of charter schools where demand for them is high, without forcing all school districts to have the same percentage of charter school seats in their system.
  • Smart Permitting: Principles governing permitting across all city agencies that include enforceable deadlines, simultaneous agencies review, and clear schedules to make them easy to navigate while maintaining substantive standards.
  • Improved Cost Competitiveness: A more competitive commercial property tax rate, to bring Boston’s rate closer to those in competitor cities such as San Francisco, Atlanta, Seattle and Miami.

Looking ahead, it is important to realize that continued economic growth is not guaranteed. The Chamber will work with leaders in the city’s government, business, and civic communities to advance the recommendations above and make Boston’s economy stronger than ever.

This report was prepared by the Chamber with research and technical assistance from EDR Group.

For more information on this report, please contact Erin Trabucco, Senior Policy Advisor.

How can Mayor-Elect Walsh strengthen the Boston economy?

On Thursday, Chamber CEO Paul Guzzi spoke with WBZ NewsRadio’s Joe Mathieu to discuss a new Chamber report that outlines key recommendations for Mayor-Elect Walsh to sustain and build on the city’s strong economic growth.

He also discussed Mayor Menino’s final major address to the business community, the latest retail sales figures, and a budget deal reached by Congressional negotiators.

Listen to this interview here.

 

Guzzi also went On the Record with NECN’s Latoyia Edwards on Thursday night to discuss this new Chamber report. Watch this interview here.

 

Chamber report outlines key economic priorities for Boston Mayor-Elect Walsh

Today, the Chamber released a new report, “A Growth Agenda for Boston,” that recommends four initiatives for Boston Mayor-Elect Martin J. Walsh and his administration on how to sustain and build on the city’s strong economic growth:

  • Regional Infrastructure: A cooperative effort by business and local government leaders throughout Greater Boston to advance three critical initiatives: the expansion of South Station, new international connections at Logan Airport, and improvements to the Port of Boston.
  • Charter School Floating Cap: A “floating cap” to expand the supply of charter schools where demand for them is high, without forcing all school districts to have the same percentage of charter school seats in their system.
  • Smart Permitting: Principles governing permitting across all city agencies that include enforceable deadlines, simultaneous agencies review, and clear schedules to make them easy to navigate while maintaining substantive standards.
  • Improved Cost Competitiveness: A more competitive commercial property tax rate, to bring Boston’s rate closer to those in competitor cities such as San Francisco, Atlanta, Seattle and Miami.

With a new mayor in City Hall for the first time in twenty years, we have a unique opportunity to develop and execute a plan that will solidify Boston’s standing as a major hub of economic development and a great place to live and work for years to come.

As we look ahead, it is important to realize that continued economic growth is not guaranteed. Growth depends on actions taken by leaders in the city’s government, business, and civic communities, and the Chamber looks forward to being part of that dialogue.

This report was prepared by the Chamber with research and technical assistance from EDR Group.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE REPORT.